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Rhode Island PBS Press Releases

Press Release Archive
2003 2004 2005 2006



WSBE Rhode Island PBS
will now broadcast announcements of school cancellations

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (December 19, 2007) – No need to turn the channel on your child's favorite program to find out if a morning snowfall is going to change your plans. WSBE Rhode Island PBS will now broadcast announcements of school cancellations, beginning with the next snow storm.

"We're ready to provide this important service to our viewers," said Rhode Island PBS President Bob Fish. "The technology is now place to get that news on the air for parents," Fish said.

As a member of the Rhode Island Broadcasters Association, Rhode Island PBS has access to the same information as the commercial networks. The announcements of closings at schools and day care centers will appear on the lower third of the screen, while the regular programming continues uninterrupted.

Kathryn Larsen, the station's program director said, "Children can continue to watch their shows while parents can get the information they need."

Preparations are currently underway to also list cancellations on the Rhode Island PBS Web site (www.ripbs.org). WSBE Rhode Island PBS broadcasts on channel 36, RI cable 8, DirecTV 36, Dish Network 7776.


NEW ENGLAND PORTRAIT Goes to the North Pole
Viewers Take a Behind-the-Scenes Look at the Transformation of Gillette Stadium

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (December 5, 2007) – December's New England Portrait takes a behind-the-scenes look at the transformation of Gillette Stadium in Foxboro, Massachusetts, into the winter wonderland of the North Pole for The Polar Express™ Train Ride. The sold-out event was held on December 1 and 2 to benefit the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Eastern New England.

New England Portrait producer and host Mary Lou Palumbo interviews The Polar Express™ author and Providence resident Chris Van Allsburg, who talks about his work and about giving back to the community

This 30-minute episode of New England Portrait will air on WSBE Rhode Island PBS on Monday, December 17 at 7 PM; Saturday, December 22 at 7:30 PM; and on Sunday, December 23 at 11:30 AM. WSBE Rhode Island PBS broadcasts on channel 36, digital 36.1, Rhode Island cable channel 8, DirecTV 36, and Dish Network 7776.


You Must Be This Tall: The Story of Rocky Point Park

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (November 26, 2007) – On Monday, December 3, WSBE Rhode Island PBS celebrates that which uniquely defines our state and our rich heritage.

Beginning at 7 PM on channel 36, digital 36.1, and Rhode Island cable channel 8, Rhode Island's Historic Lighthouses features the cinematography of Jim Karpeichik in this beautifully filmed virtual tour of our beacons on the Bay.

At 8 PM, the exclusive television premiere of You Must Be This Tall: The Story of Rocky Point Park takes viewers back in time to revisit one of Rhode Island's famous landmarks.

At 10 PM, Wooden Bats and Dusty Hands: The Grays features the modern-day local team that plays old-fashioned baseball.

Finally, at 10:30 PM, Festa celebrates the large annual festival in New Bedford, Massachusetts, and traces the festival's roots back to the island of Madeira in the Azores.


New England Portrait The Rhode Island Women of World War II:
In Their Own Words

Special Program Profiles Four Local Women Veterans and is
Broadcast in Connection with THE WAR, a Ken Burns Film

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (September 18, 2007) – New England Portrait: The Rhode Island Women of World War II: In Their Own Words profiles local women veterans, who share their compelling stories with a studio audience of area students, educators, and invited guests. The one-hour program airs on Rhode Island PBS on Sunday, September 23, 2007, at 7 PM, with rebroadcast on Monday night at 10 PM, on channel 36, digital 36.1, RI cable 8, DirecTV 36, and Dish 7776.

The show is the culmination of a grant-funded community engagement project by Rhode Island PBS surrounding THE WAR, the latest documentary by award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns.

Earlier this year, WETA, Washington D.C.'s flagship public television station and co-producer of THE WAR, announced grants from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting to fund public televisions stations' community engagement efforts - including production of local programming, outreach, and education initiatives.

The winning Rhode Island PBS application proposed to document local women veterans' histories by bringing together Rhode Island students and World War II veterans, in a local extension of the Library of Congress Veterans History Project, and then produce a show about the project.

Mary Lou Palumbo, host and producer of New England Portrait, presents the program in a "town hall" format. Video profiles of four women veterans will serve as the basis for discussion:

Arlene Chilson (of East Greenwich) was a gunnery instructor who taught men all the aspects of gun use including stripping, re-assembly, and shooting.

Arlene Chilson (of East Greenwich) was a gunnery instructor who taught men all the aspects of gun use including stripping, re-assembly, and shooting.

Tina McNeil (of Smithfield), whose passion is singing, put her talent to good use as a soloist with the USO.

Dot Midgley (of Riverside) was responsible for the wellbeing of the enlisted women, and is a collector of World War II memorabilia. Many of her vintage photos, recruiting posters, and other collectibles are used in the show.

The program also includes discussion with Judy Barrett Litoff, an historical consultant and accomplished author well versed in World War II history, and Dr. Evelyn Cherpack, curator of the Naval Historical Collection, the archives and manuscripts division of the Naval War College Library.

THE WAR, a co-production of Florentine Films and WETA, is a seven-episode, 14-hour film directed and produced by Burns and his long-time co-producer, Lynn Novick. The film will premiere on Rhode Island PBS on Sunday, September 23. Parts 2-4 will air Monday through Wednesday, September 24 - 26; parts 5-7 will air Sunday through Tuesday, September 30, October 1 and 2. All episodes of THE WAR begin at 8 PM.

For more information about the program or about the oral history project, please call Rhode Island PBS at 401-222-3636.


RI Community Food Bank & Rhode Island PBS Announces Debut of the Educational TV Series: Common $ense Cooking

The 12 Episode Series is Also Available on Food Bank's Website: www.rifoodbank.org

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND – On Wednesday morning, September 19th, the Rhode Island Community Food Bank and Rhode Island PBS announced the debut of Common $ense Cooking, an innovative educational series of twelve, 2-5 minute television interstitials focused on nutritious and affordable meal planning. The series aims to make an impact by showing ways that low-cost food and food available through the Food Bank's network can create healthy and nutritious meals for families.

The project is the result of the hard-work and generosity of the Food Bank's Women Ending Hunger group. Formed in 2005, the group came together after a call from the Food Bank to women leaders throughout the state to join in the mission of helping others. Today, more than 100 women from the business community, government, health, education, and non-profit sectors are part of Women Ending Hunger.

"Women Ending Hunger is dedicated to empowering women to improve the health and well-being of children and families served by the Food Bank's network," commented Rhode Island PBS Development Director Tracey Cugno, an active member of Women Ending Hunger, and facilitator of production of the series in partnership with the Food Bank. "Rhode Island PBS is excited to have the opportunity to continue giving back to the community and helping to enrich the lives of Rhode Island families."

Common $ense Cooking is hosted by Nancy Verde Barr, the former executive chef to Julia Child with guest appearances by Dr. Mary Flynn, assistant professor of medicine at Brown University, who created the inexpensive, nutritious recipes for the series. Both women are members of the Food Bank's Board of Directors

"This series targets women, the primary shoppers, cooks, care givers, and breadwinners in many households," added Dr. Mary Flynn. "The tips on meal planning, nutrition, and shopping on a budget will go a long way in improving the lives of many families."

The segments will air between full-length programs throughout the Rhode Island PBS broadcast schedule. Episodes of Common $ense Cooking are also available, in their entirety, on the Food Bank's website - please visit www.rifoodbank.org.

Common $ense Cooking has been made possible by the generosity of the presenting sponsor, Bank of America, with special gifts from The Rhode Island Foundation, Johnson & Wales University, Lowe's and Women Ending Hunger.

Currently, the Rhode Island Community Food Bank feeds more than 40,000 Rhode Islanders each month through a network of nearly 400 certified member agency programs. A new USDA statistical study on food insecurity shows that 1 of every 8 Rhode Island households does not have enough to eat - this is an increase from 1 of 10 in 1998.

Common $ense Cooking Episodes

1. How to Prepare a Shopping List
2. The Magic Three: Store Cards, Circulars and Coupons
3. Eating Healthy: The Fab 5 Food Groups
4. How to Make Six Meals for $20 (with special guest, Dr. Mary Flynn)
5. Breakfast is Brain Food
6. Common $ense Snacking
7. Nutrition Lesson: Portion Proportion (with special guest, Dr. Mary Flynn)
8. Nutrition Lesson: How to Read Labels (with special guest, Dr. Mary Flynn)
9. Save Money, Eat Healthy: Bring a Lunch!
10. The Ready Pantry
11. The Benefits of Meatless Meals 12. Dine In Instead! Alternatives to Eating Out


New England Portrait The Rhode Island Women of World War II:
In Their Own Words


Special Program Profiles Four Local Women Veterans and is Broadcast
in Connection with THE WAR, a Ken Burns Film

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (September 14, 2007) – Rhode Island PBS proudly presents the premier of New England Portrait on September 23 at 7 PM. The first show is entitled, "The Rhode Island Women of World War II: In Their Own Words."

Rhode Island PBS producer and host, Mary Lou Palumbo, profiles local veterans who share their compelling stories in front of a studio audience of area students, educators, and invited guests.

The show stems from an oral history project that brought students and World War II women veterans together over the summer. The history project and production of this New England Portrait episode are funded in part by a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, in connection with the Rhode Island PBS broadcast of the latest epic documentary by award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns, THE WAR, which premiers on Rhode Island PBS on September 23 at 8 PM.

This episode of New England Portrait features video profiles of four women veterans, whose stories will serve as topics of discussion:

Arlene Chilson (of East Greenwich) was a gunnery instructor who taught men all the aspects of gun use including stripping, re-assembly, and shooting.

Dr. Mary Ravin (of East Greenwich) was inspired to enlist by her father, a soldier in World War I. Mary also shares the emotional story of how her aunt and uncle were murdered by Nazis.

Tina McNeil (of Smithfield), whose passion is singing, put her talent to good use as a soloist with the USO.

Dot Midgley (of Riverside) was responsible for the wellbeing of the enlisted women, and is a collector of World War II memorabilia. Many of her vintage photos, recruiting posters, and other items are being used to produce the show.

Mary Lou Palumbo will be joined by two distinguished guests, Judy Barrett Litoff, an historical consultant and accomplished author well versed in World War II history, and Dr. Evelyn Cherpack, curator of the Naval Historical Collection, the archives and manuscripts division of the Naval War College Library.

An encore broadcast of the program is scheduled for 10 P.M. on Monday, September 24 on Rhode Island PBS (channel 36/digital 36.1/RI cable 8/DirecTV 36/Dish Network 7776).

For more information about the program or about the oral history project, please call Rhode Island PBS at 401-222-3636.


Rhode Island PBS Launches Second Channel: LEARN
Digital 36.2 Features Lifelong Learning Content

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (August 31, 2007) – Beginning in September, owners of digital televisions (or digital converters) statewide, and Verizon cable subscribers, will have another TV viewing option as Rhode Island PBS launches its new channel, LEARN on digital 36.2 and Verizon 878. At this time, LEARN is not yet available through other cable providers.

Not a mere mirror of the Rhode Island PBS primary channel (digital 36.1), LEARN will have its own program schedule, signing on at 7 AM Monday through Friday and 9:30 AM on Saturday and Sunday. LEARN will sign off at 11 PM each night.

LEARN will feature educational programming in the broad sense of that term, with programming that spans the lifelong learning cycle from pre-school to elderly adult. Weekday program content will include children's programs, classroom instruction and professional development for teachers; daytime weekend content will include adult education programs, "How To" series, public affairs programs, and rebroadcast of prime time programming. LEARN's prime time schedule will have a different theme each night of the week, beginning at 8 PM.

Basic LEARN programming framework:

WEEKDAY PROGRAMMING
(7 A.M. - 8 P.M.) 7 A.M. to Noon Pre-school programming
Noon to 3:30 P.M. Instructional television and Annenberg professional development programs for educators
3:30 P.M. to 7 P.M. PBS Kids GO! programming (appropriate for children age 6 and older)
7 P.M. Nightly Business Report
7:30 P.M. BBC World News
8 P.M. to 11 P.M. PRIME TIME SCHEDULE (See Below)

WEEKEND PROGRAMMING
(9:30 A.M. - 8 P.M.) 9:30 A.M. to 4 P.M. Adult learning, GED, ESL, public affairs programs; rebroadcast of prime time programming; How-To programming (cooking, gardening, crafts)
4 P.M. to 6 P.M. Children's programming (appropriate for children age 6 and older)
6 P.M. to 8 P.M. Rebroadcast of Rhode Island PBS productions and local programming

PRIME TIME PROGRAMMING
(8 P.M. - 11 P.M.) Each night will have a general theme to the programming:

Monday
Fine Arts
Art and art history programming
Thursday
Musical Performing arts
Classical music, ballet, opera
Tuesday
Natural History
Nature, Scientific American Frontiers, Secrets of the Dead, and limited series about nature, science, and technology

Friday
How-to

Saturday
Contemporary Music arts
Austin City Limits, Soundstage

Wednesday
Documentary
POV, Independent Lens, issues-oriented documentaries
Sunday
History
American Experience, Colonial House, Frontier House, Civil War

For complete program listings on LEARN, contact Rhode Island PBS or visit www.ripbs.org.


Rhode Island PBS Presents MARIZA: LIVE FROM LISBON
Televised Concert Special Features Tickets to Her Live New Bedford Performance

When Mariza sings, time stands still." -- BBC Radio

"Vibrant and alive, she's re-making fado's ancient sadness into a majestic modern sound" -- Rolling Stone

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (August 23, 2007) – International fado superstar Mariza has established herself as the new face of Portuguese fado, seducing audiences worldwide with her breathtaking voice, charismatic stage presence, and powerful blend of traditional and contemporary song forms.

WSBE Rhode Island PBS proudly presents the multi-platinum Portuguese fado singer in her first U.S. concert special for public television, MARIZA: LIVE FROM LISBON on Wednesday, September 12 at 8 P.M. on WSBE Rhode Island PBS channel 36, digital 36.1, cable 8 in Rhode Island (Massachusetts cable subscribers should check their cable provider's listings for channel number), DirecTV36, and Dish 7776.

Songs of longing and despair are a national tradition in Portugal. Fado is Portugal’s brand of soulful blues: deeply melancholic and filled with longing. The word "fado" comes from the Latin fatum, meaning fate, destiny or doom.

Mariza’s mesmerizing alto, enthusiasm and commanding stage presence make her distinctive interpretation of the genre as infectious as modern-day pop. In MARIZA: LIVE FROM LISBON, the enchanting performance at the Tower of Belém garden includes the songstress’ greatest hits “Loucura,” “Maria Lisboa” and “Ó Gente Da Minha Terra,” and her latest hit “Transparente,” from her award-winning studio album by the same name. Backed by Portuguese guitar and full orchestra, the Sinfonietta de Lisboa conducted by Jaques Morelenbaum, Mariza’s memorable performance is sure to spark a new romance with American audiences, and kindle fond memories and cultural pride in audiences of Portuguese heritage.

Song list: "Loucura", "Maria Lisboa", "Há Uma Música Do Povo", "Barco Negro", "Recusa", "Primavera", "Chuva" and "Ó Gente Da Minha Terra".

Mariza will perform in person at the Zeiterion Theatre in New Bedford, Massachusetts, on October 6 and 7. Rhode Island PBS is delighted to have tickets to Mariza's live local performance. For full information about getting tickets through Rhode Island PBS, please tune in on September 12 at 8 P.M.


Rhode Island PBS Families Celebrate
Station's 40th Birthday at the Zoo

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (July 27, 2007) – Close to 1,000 people - from infants in strollers to senior citizens - poured through the gates at Roger Williams Park Zoo Wednesday evening to celebrate the fortieth birthday of Rhode Island PBS (WSBE channel 36). The after-hours event, sponsored in part by Sylvan Learning Centers, was for Rhode Island PBS members and their families and friends. The invitation included free zoo admission, photos with PBS Kids characters Clifford the Big Red Dog and Maya and Miguel, games, face painting, music and storytelling, and ice cream cones courtesy of Munroe Dairy.

"We wanted to show our appreciation to our members and supporters," said Bob Fish, president of Rhode Island PBS. "Our anniversary actually celebrates them. It's thanks to community support that Rhode Island PBS has reached this milestone."

"We love channel 36!" exclaimed Nancy Freeman of Pawtucket as she and her two children waited in line to check in. "This is such a nice thing for the station to do," Freeman added.

"Our gala is coming up in October, but we wanted to have a family event this summer that kids and adults could enjoy together," Fish said.

Ellie and Bob Conti of Cumberland, members of Rhode Island PBS for five years, brought their daughter and two granddaughters to the event. They took a break from the festivities to enjoy a picnic supper together.

"It's great to see such a range of ages here," Fish remarked. "I think it reflects the station's wide appeal - we really do bridge generations."


**UPDATE**
Rhode Island's Own Atwater-Donnelly
Featured in Documentary on Rhode Island PBS

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (July 26, 2007) – Just in time for the upcoming Newport Folk Festival, Rhode Island PBS proudly presents a folk music special, Going Up Home: The Passion of Atwater-Donnelly on Wednesday, August 1 at 9 PM (WSBE channel 36, RI cable 8, DirecTV 36, Dish Network 7776; Massachusetts cable subscribers should check local listings for channel).

Written and directed by Aubrey Atwater and Elwood Donnelly's youngest son Uriah, this hour-long documentary looks at the lives of these two award-winning Rhode Island folk musicians in their own words. Reflecting on the duo's childhood to the present day, the film introduces people who have been affected by the passion of Atwater-Donnelly, including Richard Walton, Bob Hollis, John and Heidi Cerrigione, and Kris Hansen.

Based in Rhode Island, Atwater and Donnelly have performed and researched traditional folk music and dance in Ireland, England, Prince Edward Island, New England, the Ozarks, Appalachia, and other key places in the United States. They have performed or shared festival billing with folk legends Jean Ritchie, Pete Seeger, and Doc Watson.

The highly praised husband-wife duo present delightful programs of traditional American and Celtic folk songs, a cappella pieces, hymns, dance tunes, and original works. Elwood and Aubrey blend unusual harmonies, and play guitar, Appalachian mountain dulcimer, mandolin, tin whistle, harmonica, banjo, bones, spoons, limberjacks, and other surprises including Appalachian clog dancing and French Canadian footwork. They often collaborate with other musicians and dancers and can be seen performing solo, as a duo, trio, four-person band, or a six-member old-time gospel band. In recent years, they have performed with Cathy Clasper-Torch on fiddle, cello, and vocals, adding a rich third dimension. Since 2003, the Atwater-Donnelly Trio has become more and more popular in Southern New England.

Atwater and Donnelly's performance is appealing to all ages, and with humor, audience participation, and a relaxed stage presence, Aubrey and Elwood explain song origins to create a deeper understanding of the music and its cultural history. Their extensive repertoire permits special programs and workshops at festivals, schools, colleges, and libraries.

Aubrey and Elwood met as volunteers at the Stone Soup Coffeehouse in Providence in early 1987. Within just a few months these self-taught Rhode Island musicians formed a duo. Married since 1989, Aubrey and Elwood perform throughout the United States and abroad.

In 2005, Aubrey and Elwood appeared in six performances of a play called "Folktown: The Story of the Fifth Mary," which was written and produced by playwright Bob Hollis and based around twenty-two songs in the Atwater-Donnelly repertoire. This exciting community project involved approximately one hundred people and took place in their home town of Foster.

The Atwater-Donnelly Duo won Motif Magazine's "Best Local Folk Act" award in 2006 and well as three awards in 2007: "Best Folk Act" for the Atwater-Donnelly Band, "Album of the Year" for The Halfway Ground, and "Best Female Vocalist" for Aubrey Atwater.


Rhode Island's Own Atwater and Donnelly
Featured in Rhode Island PBS Documentary
Screening Video Available

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (July 20, 2007) – On August 1 at 9 P.M., Rhode Island PBS proudly presents a folk music special, Going Up Home: The Passion of Atwater-Donnelly. Written and directed by Aubrey Atwater and Elwood Donnelly's youngest son Uriah, this hour-long documentary looks at the lives of these two award-winning Rhode Island folk musicians in their own words. Reflecting on the duo's childhood to the present day, the film introduces people who have been affected by the passion of Atwater-Donnelly, including Richard Walton, Bob Hollis, John and Heidi Cerrigione, and Kris Hansen.

Based in Rhode Island, Atwater and Donnelly have performed and researched traditional folk music and dance in Ireland, England, Prince Edward Island, New England, the Ozarks, Appalachia, and other key places in the United States. They have performed or shared festival billing with folk legends Jean Ritchie, Pete Seeger, and Doc Watson.

The highly praised husband-wife duo present delightful programs of traditional American and Celtic folk songs, a cappella pieces, hymns, dance tunes, and original works. Elwood and Aubrey blend unusual harmonies, and play guitar, Appalachian mountain dulcimer, mandolin, tin whistle, harmonica, banjo, bones, spoons, limberjacks, and other surprises including Appalachian clog dancing and French Canadian footwork. They often collaborate with other musicians and dancers and can be seen performing solo, as a duo, trio, four-person band, or a six-member old-time gospel band. In recent years, they have performed with Cathy Clasper-Torch on fiddle, cello, and vocals, adding a rich third dimension. Since 2003, the Atwater-Donnelly Trio has become more and more popular in Southern New England.

The highly praised husband-wife duo present delightful programs of traditional American and Celtic folk songs, a cappella pieces, hymns, dance tunes, and original works. Elwood and Aubrey blend unusual harmonies, and play guitar, Appalachian mountain dulcimer, mandolin, tin whistle, harmonica, banjo, bones, spoons, limberjacks, and other surprises including Appalachian clog dancing and French Canadian footwork. They often collaborate with other musicians and dancers and can be seen performing solo, as a duo, trio, four-person band, or a six-member old-time gospel band. In recent years, they have performed with Cathy Clasper-Torch on fiddle, cello, and vocals, adding a rich third dimension. Since 2003, the Atwater-Donnelly Trio has become more and more popular in Southern New England.

Aubrey and Elwood met as volunteers at the Stone Soup Coffeehouse in Providence in early 1987. Within just a few months these self-taught Rhode Island musicians formed a duo. Married since 1989, Aubrey and Elwood perform throughout the United States and abroad.

In 2005, Aubrey and Elwood appeared in six performances of a play called "Folktown: The Story of the Fifth Mary," which was written and produced by playwright Bob Hollis and based around twenty-two songs in the Atwater-Donnelly repertoire. This exciting community project involved approximately one hundred people and took place in their home town of Foster.

The Atwater-Donnelly Duo won Motif Magazine's "Best Local Folk Act" award in 2006 and well as three awards in 2007: "Best Folk Act" for the Atwater-Donnelly Band, "Album of the Year" for The Halfway Ground, and "Best Female Vocalist" for Aubrey Atwater.

Please contact Lucie Houle at Rhode Island PBS for a preview copy of the program.


Bristol’s Fourth of July:
A Celebration of History and Independence
Rhode Island PBS Production Traces Roots of Annual Tradition

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (June 27, 2007) – The red, white and blue lines in the middle of Hope Street are freshly repainted and the porches and doorways of the historic homes will soon be festooned with bunting, flags, and swags of stars and stripes. It’s the spirit of Bristol, Rhode Island, “America’s Most Patriotic Town” and home of the longest running Independence Day celebration in the country.

Rhode Island PBS film crew captured the behind-the-scenes preparations for the 2007 Fourth of July celebration, and traced the origins and evolution of 222 years of commemorative ceremonies and traditions. The hour-long documentary, Bristol’s Fourth of July: A Celebration of History and Independence, is produced by Bristol native Mary Lou Palumbo, and will air on Sunday, July 1 at 11 A.M. and 6:30 P.M., and again on Monday, July 2 at 7 P.M. on WSBE channel 36, cable channel 8 in Rhode Island (Massachusetts cable subscribers should check local listings), DirecTV 36, and Dish Network 7776.

Vintage photos and archival film take viewers back in time to witness some of the early observances, as well as discover how the patriotic exercises, the historic parade, the Miss Fourth of July pageant, and other key events, all got started and why the tradition is still going strong.


2007 Series of Short Films by Local Filmmakers
Airs on Rhode Island PBS Beginning May 31
Series and Two Community Forums Will Run for Four Consecutive Thursdays

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (May 17, 2007) – Rhode Island Council for the Humanities (RICH) and Rhode Island PBS present their third annual thematic film series and short film initiative, beginning on Thursday, May 31 at 9 PM, and continuing each Thursday through June 21, on WSBE Rhode Island PBS (channel 36, RI cable 8, DirecTV 36, and Dish 7776). The first presentation on May 31 includes two one-hour programs starting at 9 PM.

The first hour is a community forum entitled, Here At Home: What Unites Us? What Divides? Adult Communities in Conversation. Social groups that were once integral to building a sense of community have either disappeared altogether, or changed to maintain viability. Whether by accident or by design, new ways of building community have emerged – ways that were unheard of a generation ago.

Moderator Marc Joel Levitt brings together a diverse group of panelists who share their perspective on unique ways Rhode Islanders find and build community today. Scheduled panelists include Bill Warmless of the Pawtucket Red Sox; Barnaby Evans, creator and director of WaterFire; Janice Thompson, pastor of River of Life Church and chaplain at the ACI; Marta Martinez, oral historian; and Roger Blumberg, visiting assistant professor in the Computer Science Department at Brown University.

The forum will feature the following short films by Providence resident Lisa Delmonico. Another of her short films – about class differences in Rhode Island – will air as part of this series on June 21.

The Colombian American Cultural Society is dedicated to preserving the culture of Colombia for residents of Rhode Island who are immigrants and children of immigrants from Colombia. In this film, two of the Society’s board members, Gabriel Martinez and Gloria Hincapie, discuss what being Colombian-American means to them and the importance of community for new immigrants. The two also describe their struggle to maintain their Colombian roots while embracing their new country.

The creators of Unisong organize monthly community-based singing sessions. Led by Jodi Glass, the Providence-based group is dedicated to bringing all different types of people together with one common goal: sharing a joyful experience through song. In this film Ms. Glass and co-organizer Kathy Jellison reflect on the universality of music and how coming together in harmony is essential for a peaceful, productive community.

The Providence Pug Meetup Group uses a new form of community - the Internet - as a way to socialize with one another and organize monthly get-togethers. Organizer Sandra Allen is responsible for maintaining one of the largest “meetup” groups in Rhode Island: pug dog owners. In this film we meet the pugs and their owners as they get together at Dogz Downtown in Providence for frolic and fun. The popularity of the pug meetup group proves that community is important to four-legged creatures as well!

Knitting circles have existed for ages but with a recent surge in popularity, they are now considered cool! In this film, Delmonico visits a group of knitters who meet weekly in North Providence. Led by master knitter Donna Zannelli, the lively group banters, gossips, drops stitches and spins a good yarn. This community group proves that a shared passion for a craft can turn an ordinary Thursday night into an hysterically fun time.

At 10 PM on May 31, Newport filmmaker Rocco Michaluk presents the diverse community in Newport. Michaluk is the director of video for Video & Vision Multimedia Productions in Newport, and his past documentary work includes oral history projects for Fort Adams; Wind, Sea, Sky; and Vanishing Orchards.

Immediately following Michaluk's film, Rhode Island PBS will air the Independent Lens film, Two Square Miles, about the conflicts unfolding as a proposed multinational coal-fired cement plant threatens to reshape the historic community of Hudson, New York.

For more information about the telecast of the 2007 Here At Home: What Unites Us? What Divides Us? series, visit www.ripbs.org. For information about the short film initiative, visit www.rihumanities.org.

Funding for the 2007 Here at Home: What Unites Us? What Divides Us? short film initiative and thematic film series was provided by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities We The People initiative, and from a connector grant from the National Center for Outreach.

The mission of the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities is to inspire and support intellectual curiosity and imagination in all Rhode Islanders through lifelong learning in the humanities.


UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND UNDERGRADUATE COMMENCEMENT 2007
Rhode Island PBS Presents Live Coverage of Sunday's Ceremonies

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (May 15, 2007) – On Sunday, May 20, more than 2,500 undergraduate degrees will be awarded during the University of Rhode Island's 2007 commencement ceremonies. WSBE Rhode Island PBS will broadcast the 90-minute event live from the Kingston campus, beginning at 12:30 PM, on channel 36, on cable channel 8 in Rhode Island (Massachusetts cable subscribers should check local channel listings), on DirecTV 36, and on Dish Network 7776.

Hosts Dave Lavallee and Barbara Meagher will introduce the program, providing commentary and context, as well as some history about the ceremonial traditions. The opening segment will also profile unique stories of several graduating seniors, and will include a live interview with University President Dr. Robert Carothers.

Former U.S. Senator Lincoln Chafee will deliver the University’s 121st commencement address. Chafee will receive an honorary Doctor of Laws degree. Music supporter Sebastian Paul Musco of Newport Beach, California, will receive an honorary Doctor of Arts degree.

Graduating senior and Providence resident Allison Pirolli, selected by a Student Senate competition, will deliver the student commencement address. Allison graduates with a degree in communication studies and a minor in leadership.

For more information about the commencement exercises, visit www.uri.edu or contact Jan Wenzel at 401-874-2116. For more information about the broadcast on WSBE Rhode Island PBS, call the station at 401-222-3636.


NEW ENGLAND ACCENT:
Focus on Underage Drinking and Driving

Award-Winning Special Airs Just in Time for Prom Season

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (May 4, 2007) – With the prom and graduation party season upon us, Rhode Island PBS presents a one-hour special, New England Accent: Focus on Underage Drinking and Driving, on Saturday, May 12 at 6 PM on WSBE channel 36, cable channel 8 in Rhode Island (Massachusetts cable subscribers should check local listings), DirecTV 36, and Dish Network 7776.

Rhode Island Attorney General Patrick Lynch joins host Mary Lou Palumbo for a discussion in front of a studio audience. Mothers Lori Nunes and Linda Chaves, who lost sons separate in drunk-driving accidents, share personal stories of their devastating loss, and high school students from Woonsocket and East Greenwich offer poignant feedback. Other contributors include Gabrielle Abbate, executive director of Rhode Island Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), Robin Cullen of Connecticut MADD, retired RI State Police Colonel Steven Pare, and via satellite, William Georges, vice president of programs at The Century Council.

The compelling special was taped in 2006 before a studio audience, and produced by Cox Communications. Focus on Underage Drinking and Driving received Cable World Magazine's public affairs award, the cable industry's prestigious Beacon Award, and is nominated for a 2007 Boston / New England Emmy Award.

Now celebrating its 40th anniversary year, WSBE Rhode Island PBS is owned and operated by the Rhode Island Public Telecommunications Authority, a quasi-public agency of the State of Rhode Island. Rhode Island PBS is a viewer-supported member of the Public Broadcasting Service. Dedicated to lifelong learning, Rhode Island PBS uses the power of commercial-free media to educate, engage, enrich, inspire, and entertain viewers of all ages in Rhode Island, southeastern Massachusetts, and eastern Connecticut. For more information about the programs and services at Rhode Island PBS, visit www.RIpbs.org.


Rhode Island PBS and R.I. Department of Education Pilot
Project Expands Access to GED Adult Education
GED Instructors Being Recruited for Video-On-Demand Technology Training

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (April 20, 2007) – The Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (RIDE) and Rhode Island PBS Education Services have formed a partnership to launch a groundbreaking pilot project entitled, “Enhancing GED Instruction through the Use of Video-On-Demand.” Headed by RIDE Director of Adult Education Dr. Johan E. Uvin, and Rhode Island PBS Education Services Director Dr. María D. Velásquez, the project will train up to 42 GED instructors statewide to use video-on-demand (VOD) technology, and will make the digital content of the 39 episodes of the GED Connection series available to their adult education students.

The convenience and accessibility of VOD allows students to view their lessons and complete their assignments at any time and from any computer with Internet access. This flexibility is expected to appeal to members of the GED-eligible adult education population who might otherwise find it difficult to pursue a GED certificate through the more traditional method of classroom instruction.

“This partnership is another example of how the Education Department is working with various agencies to bring all students, including adult learners, to proficiency,” said Peter McWalters, Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education. “Making available GED-preparation videos on demand is only the first initiative in a series of technology-based learning options we want to establish so that Rhode Island adults can build their skills anytime, anywhere. Efforts such as these will enable Rhode Islanders to increasingly meet the skill requirements of the new Rhode Island economy.”

"This project offers a new learning experience for GED teachers and students alike," said Bob Fish, president of Rhode Island PBS. "Students will acquire valuable technology skills and build confidence as they learn marketable skills from the GED content. But the GED instructors will be learning as well, improving their own technology skills."

According to January 2007 statistics from the Office of Adult Education at RIDE, slightly more than 177,000 Rhode Islanders fall into the GED target population: They are 16 years of age or older, are not enrolled in school, have no high school diploma, and may have limited proficiency in English. Of those, nearly 142,000 do not have a high school diploma, and approximately 25,000 lack a high school credential and have limited English proficiency (i.e., report speaking no English at all or not speaking English well, according to U.S. Census 2000).

During a recent information session and preview of the pilot project at Rhode Island PBS, the directors and administrators of adult literacy agencies and organizations expressed their interest and enthusiasm for the project, seeing it as an innovative additional teaching and learning tool, and an important way to expand access to GED instruction.

VOD technology allows users to watch video over the Internet. Users select a video from a menu of files stored on a remote server and then watch the video in a media player. The media player's video buffer stores and presents the content, so the video file is never actually downloaded to the user’s computer. This technology, also known as streaming video, allows large movie files to start faster and run smoother than if the file had to be downloaded to the user’s computer.

Rhode Island PBS currently offers a video streaming curriculum program - with a library of 5,000 full-length and 50,000 clips of national and state education standards-based videos, complete with lesson plans, quizzes, and tests - to classrooms and libraries in K-12 schools throughout the state.

The GED pilot project is a unique endeavor in Rhode Island's adult education system, with real-time development, usage, and testing of the GED Connection VOD content. During this pilot project, GED instructors will learn how to create user accounts for themselves and their students; design digital content for assignments, quizzes, and pre- and post-tests; implement student performance and program evaluations; and report utilization data.

Participating GED instructors will attend three training sessions of four hours each, for a total of 12 training hours. Training sessions are structured for beginner, intermediate, and advanced user levels, as determined by the teachers’ self-evaluation of their technology skills. GED instructors who also hold an elementary or secondary education teaching certificate will be eligible to receive continuing education credits toward that certificate by participating in the pilot project.

To be eligible to participate, GED instructors must teach in the state of Rhode Island, have students currently enrolled in GED classes, and agree to attend the three training sessions and to submit two utilization reports. Recruitment for the pilot project is underway and will continue until May 10 or until the 42 training slots are filled, whichever comes first. Training sessions will be conducted from May 21 through June 4 at University Hall (Library Building) at Johnson & Wales University in Providence.

Training Sessions Date
Time
Session I BeginnerMonday, May 21, 2007
1pm-5pm
Session II BeginnerThursday, May 24, 2007
1pm-5pm
Session III BeginnerWednesday, May 30, 2007
1pm-5pm
Session I IntermediateTuesday, May 22, 2007
1pm-5pm
Session II IntermediateFriday, May 25, 2007
1pm-5pm
Session III IntermediateThursday, May 31, 2007
1pm-5pm
Session I AdvancedWednesday, May 23, 2007
1pm-5pm
Session II AdvancedTuesday, May 29, 2007
1pm-5pm
Session III AdvancedFriday, June 1, 2007
1pm-5pm
Make-up SessionMonday, June 4, 2007
1pm-5pm

To be eligible to participate, GED instructors must teach in the state of Rhode Island, have students currently enrolled in GED classes, and agree to attend the three training sessions and to submit two utilization reports. Recruitment for the pilot project is underway and will continue until May 10 or until the 42 training slots are filled, whichever comes first. Training sessions will be conducted from May 21 through June 4 at University Hall (Library Building) at Johnson & Wales University in Providence.

The mission of the Board of Regents for Elementary and Secondary Education is “to lead and support schools and communities in ensuring that all students achieve at the high levels needed to lead fulfilling and productive lives, to compete in academic and employment settings, and to contribute to society.” For more information about the R.I. Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, visit www.ride.ri.gov

Now celebrating its 40th anniversary year, WSBE Rhode Island PBS is owned and operated by the Rhode Island Public Telecommunications Authority, a quasi-public agency of the State of Rhode Island. Rhode Island PBS is a viewer-supported member of the Public Broadcasting Service. Dedicated to lifelong learning, Rhode Island PBS uses the power of commercial-free media to educate, engage, enrich, and inspire viewers of all ages in Rhode Island, southeastern Massachusetts, and eastern Connecticut. For more information about the programs and services at Rhode Island PBS, visit www.RIpbs.org.


Nature
Save Your Saturdays for NATURE and "PAWS for a NATURE Break"

Rhode Island PBS is Awarded a CPB Promotion and Outreach Grant for February Contest

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (January 18, 2007) – Lions and tiger and bears… and so much more - oh my! NATURE, now in its 25th anniversary season, takes audiences up close and personal to explore the creatures and natural wonders in this wild world of ours like few others can. Throughout February, Rhode Island PBS is running a NATURE Trivia Scavenger Safari, and invites viewers to "Paws for a NATURE Break" for clues to the Feature Creature of the Week. Participating in this four-week contest could mean a trip for two to tropical Costa Rica!

Rhode Island PBS competed with 40 other public television stations nationwide, and was one of only 6 selected to receive a $10,000 grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB). The CPB, through NATURE, is supporting local public television stations' promotion and outreach efforts to celebrate NATURE 's anniversary - to stir series interest in new audiences as well as in viewers who may not watch the program on a regular basis.

The winning Rhode Island PBS proposal seeks to encourage a weekly NATURE viewing habit by providing an incentive to tune in each week. The contest is unique not only among the grant proposals, but is a first for the station, too: offer an 8-day vacation for two as a reward for watching TV and paying attention. Not bad!

Each week for the four weeks in February, Rhode Island PBS will air clues to the identity of the Feature Creature of the Week. Viewers then watch the NATURE episode on Saturday nights at 8 (re-broadcast Tuesday afternoons at 2:30) to identify the critter, based on the clues. There's no purchase necessary, and Rhode Island PBS membership is not required to qualify. However, sharp eyes and ears are needed because viewers must be exact in identifying the creature of the week (BIG HINT: the creature isn't simply identified by the episode title). Viewers can enter the contest online immediately after the episode, or mail or drop off the completed entry form to the station by noon on the following Friday. A random drawing of combined online and mail entries will be held at 3 PM each Friday, February 9, 16, 23, and March 2.

The contest is exclusive to the Rhode Island PBS viewing area - Rhode Island, southeastern Massachusetts and eastern Connecticut. Although odds of winning are determined by the number of correct entries received, the fact that the contest is being run in a very limited geographical area and not nationwide bodes well for those who submit correct entries.

In keeping with the animal theme, weekly prizes will be awarded "two by two": winners will receive two passes to two area NATURE-themed attractions. Mystic Aquarium, Roger Williams Park Zoo, and Feinstein IMAX Theatre are providing the pairs of admission passes. Weekly prize packages are valued at $59 or more.

To be eligible for the Grand Prize trip for two to Costa Rica, valued at $3,000, entrants must correctly identify all four of February's Feature Creatures of the Week. The Grand Prize drawing will be on March 9, 2007 (pending receipt of qualifying entries), and will be open to the public. Interested observers can contact the station in the preceding week to verify there were eligible entries and that the drawing will take place. Official rules and information are online at www.ripbs.org, or are available at Rhode Island PBS, 50 Park Lane, Providence.

February's NATURE Episodes

Chasing Big Cats Feb 3 at 8 PM, Feb 6 at 2:30 PM - The big cats of Africa have always been favored subjects of wildlife filmmakers. But as little as 15 years ago, no one had yet captured the unforgettable image of a leopard in its ghostly nocturnal stalk. Viewers had never seen intimate portrayals of the sleek and elusive serval, or witnessed the nighttime romps of the beautiful black-eared caracal. The team of Owen Newman and Amanda Barrett filled those gaps with a series of spectacular breakthrough films in the 1990s. Among the first to apply infrared light and night vision goggles to wildlife studies, they combined technology with intrepid determination and a strong dose of luck, illuminating the cats we hardly knew, and giving us fresh insights into those we only thought we knew, such as lions and cheetahs.

Rhinoceros Feb 10 at 8 PM, Feb 13 at 2:30 PM - They are hulking beasts from prehistory, virtually unchanged over 25 million years. Once they roamed the Earth in millions, numbering hundreds of species of all shapes and sizes, but today the rhinoceros is one of the planet's rarest animals. They've been poached and slaughtered for the black-market value of their horns. Of the remaining five species - the black, white, Indian, Javan and Sumatran rhino - three are perilously close to extinction. NATURE goes on a global mission to film each species and the fascinating strategies used to protect them.

Supersize Crocs Feb 17 at 8 PM, Feb 20 at 2:30 PM - In the early 1980s, renowned reptile expert Rom Whitaker came upon an astonishing find in Papua New Guinea: the skin of a 21-foot crocodile. In that moment, fascinating myths of giant dragon-like beasts crystallized into hard evidence. Driven by that memory - and by his concern that trophy hunting may have killed off the last of such massive crocodiles - Whitaker sets out on an epic journey to find out if any still exist.

Raptor Force Feb 24 at 8 PM, Feb 27 at 2:30 PM - They are nature's elite killing force, winged predators armed with razor-sharp talons and powerful beaks, with cunning strategies and battle tactics. Raptors are also, with their stunning speed, stealth, acrobatics, and precision, the envy of every human air force. Now, with ingenious technology capturing a breathtaking bird's-eye-view of their flight, NATURE shows why the peregrine falcon, harpy eagle, red-tail hawk, gray owl and other raptors are masters of the sky - and what fighter jets have learned from them.

For a screening copy of any of these episodes, please contact Lucie Houle at Rhode Island PBS by phone: 401-222-3636 x216, or by email: lhoule@ripbs.org

NATURE is produced by Thirteen/WNET New York for PBS. Fred Kaufman is executive producer; William Grant is executive-in-charge.

In its first 24 seasons, NATURE has won more than 360 honors from the television industry, parent groups, the international wildlife film community and environmental organizations, including eight Emmys, two Peabodys and the first award given to a television program by the Sierra Club. Most recently, The Queen of Trees (2006) won a Peabody and the NHK President's Prize, which recognizes excellence in high-definition programming, at the Banff World Television Festival.

Major corporate support for NATURE is provided by Canon U.S.A., Inc., and Ford. Additional support is provided by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the nation's public television stations.

WSBE Rhode Island PBS is owned and operated by the Rhode Island Public Telecommunications Authority, a quasi-public agency of the State of Rhode Island. Rhode Island PBS is a viewer-supported member of the Public Broadcasting Service. As Rhode Island’s most accessible learning resource, Rhode Island PBS is dedicated to the principle of lifelong learning and uses the power of media to educate, inform, enrich, inspire, and entertain viewers of all ages in Rhode Island, southeastern Massachusetts, and eastern Connecticut. For more information about the programs and services at Rhode Island PBS, visit www.RIpbs.org


Here at Home
Free Public Screening of Complete Series of Winning Local Short Films



Wednesday, January 24 at 7PM, Cable Car Cinema, South Main Street, Providence

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (January 10, 2007) – On Wednesday, January 24, 2007 at 7 PM, Rhode Island Council for the Humanities (RICH) and Rhode Island PBS will host a free public screening of the series of local filmmakers' short films from the Here At Home: What Unites Us? What Divides Us? Short Film Initiative 2006. The screening will be at the Cable Car Cinema, 204 South Main Street, Providence. Theater seating is limited, and will be on a first come-first served basis; doors open at 6 PM.

The 90-minute presentation features all of the short films, and includes taped interviews with filmmakers, giving each short film its context. Filmmakers will also attend the screening to answer audience questions after the show.

Throughout 2006, RICH and Rhode Island PBS presented selected documentaries that explored, from many different perspectives, factors that unite and divide America. Following each feature documentary was a winning selection from Here At Home: What Unites Us? What Divides Us? Short Film Initiative 2006. This initiative offered local filmmakers the chance to produce short videos that explored the Rhode Island angle to these national stories.

The following is a description of each short film and brief biographical information about its filmmaker:

FINDING A NEW FAITH: RHODE ISLANDERS CONVERT showcases several Rhode Islanders as they speak about their conversion to Islam, Judaism, and Christianity.

LISA DELMONICO is a Providence native and the producer of Everyday Happiness, a local monthly television series funded by the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities, sponsored by Hera Educational Foundation and broadcast on RI PBS/WSBE. Ms. Delmonico is a member of the Rhode Island State Home and School Oral History Project Committee. In May 2005 Ms. Delmonico screened her art installation "Yellow Cottage Projections" -- videotaped oral histories of former residents of the Rhode Island State Home projected on to the outside walls of the State Home's only remaining structure, the "Yellow Cottage." She is currently working on a New Media art piece called "Rich People Know How to Whisper, Poor People Know How to Shout," which examines the role of class when attending Rhode Island cultural events, food courts, and beaches.

ISLAM AND MUSLIMS: BEYOND MISCONCEPTIONS explores how life has changed for Rhode Island Muslims since September 11 and "Operation Iraqi Freedom."

MARIA & SCOTT SARACEN are the forces behind 3rd Story Productions. Scott, director and editor, has over ten years experience as a videographer, editor, and technician. At Rhode Island PBS, he works on numerous in-house productions including A Lively Experiment, RI's Amazing Women, and Costantino's Round Table. Maria, producer and writer, began her television career as a news reporter for Cue-TV and SABC in South Africa. Since 2001, Maria has been Rhode Island PBS' Promotions Producer, attending to the on-air image of the station and promoting prime-time programming.

MAMA'S GIRLS is about three Providence-area young girls (who participate in the Carriage House School's youth mentorship program) and their relationship to their mothers who have raised them. The short video explores how these young teens are coming-of-age without fathers in their lives.

AARON JUNGELS graduated from RISD in Film/Video in 1987. Since then, he has been a co-director of and performer in Everett Dance Theatre, a multi-media performing arts company. For the past four years, Aaron has been making videos with the students at Everett's Carriage House School in Providence, turning true stories of their lives into short dramas and documentaries.

TRANSLATE chronicles the search and struggle for identity among Rhode Island's Transgendered community. This short follows the lives of four transsexuals as they discuss their viewpoints on gender identity and "passing in society," coming out to friends and family, and their struggle to find acceptance and community.

ROCCO MICHALUK is the director of video for Video & Vision Multimedia Productions in Newport, RI. Mr. Michaluk's past documentary work includes oral history projects for Fort Adams; Wind, Sea, Sky; and Vanishing Orchards.

WIDE ANGLE explores immigration through the perspective of both recent and established immigrants living in Rhode Island. Interviews, conducted in the native language of the participants, take us from a Bengali grocer on the Eastside of Providence to one of Federal Hill's Italian restaurants.

TAIMOOR NAZIR SOBHAN was born in Rome, and lived there for most of his formative years. Born into a modern Bengali family, and schooled at a British institution, his life has been marked by a plurality of cultural currents. Mr. Sobhan recently completed an honors degree in Modern Culture & Media at Brown University. Previous awards include first prize at the Director's View International Student Film Festival in NYC for his short Day for Night.

PEOPLE MAKE THE NEIGHBORHOOD explores the contentious 2002 City Council seat race in Providence's Fox Point neighborhood. This short film examines a neighborhood in transition while also putting a microscope to the notion of what constitutes a community identity and the positive and negative effects of change on a neighborhood.

MELISSA BERUBE has worked as an Associate Producer for the Public Television series "The Visionaries" which included shoots in Ghana and Bolivia. She is currently working as a Co-Producer at Poppy Productions in Boston, MA and is working on a documentary about healthcare. Ms. Berube resides in the Fox Point neighborhood of Providence.

GONE FISHIN' takes us inside the most diverse meeting place in Providence, RI - Ocean State Tackle shop. It is here where all religious, economic and racial backgrounds converge to share their joy for the adventure of fishing. This short film weaves through themes like 'community' and 'diversity' and discovers impact this locally-owned small business has had in creating an "urban tribe" amongst its customers. (urban tribe n. A group of city dwellers who have formed a bond through a common interest, such as work or a social or recreational activity.)

MICHELLE LEBRUN has worked in film, performing arts or education for 20 years. She is the founder of HARKEN! Youth Media Program - a filmmaking program for youth to foster inquiry, critical thinking, creativity, and leadership skills through video production.

SOUTH SIDE: THE STRAINS AND GAINS OF DIVERSITY explores life in Providence's South Side neighborhood, one of the most heterogeneous areas in the State and seeks to answer how residents coping with the challenges of living in a diverse neighborhood.

HILARY SILVER is Associate Professor of Sociology and Urban Studies at Brown University. She specializes in the study of urban poverty and social inequality in the US and Western Europe. This short film draws upon Silver's sociological expertise and over a decade of research on Providence's South Side.

SOVEREIGN NATION/SOVEREIGN NEIGHBOR explores the word "sovereignty" from the Narragansett Indian point of view. In this seven-minute short film, tribe members voice how legacies of state and federal actions and laws have encouraged or discouraged understanding between the tribe and the state of Rhode Island.

KENDALL MOORE is on the faculties of both Journalism and Film-Media at the University of Rhode Island. Prior to academia, she worked in television and film production for the past 15 years. She has worked as a field producer with ABC News/Discovery Health, the Discovery Channel; producer and national project coordinator with PBS, P.O.V.; and as a medical reporter for Reuters.

RICH and Rhode Island PBS are thrilled to work together to combine the goals of their missions and bring thought-provoking programming to the Rhode Island public. Funding for this film series was provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities - We the People Initiative and the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities. For more information, please contact SueEllen Kroll, Program Officer at RICH at sue@rihumanities.org or by phone at (401) 273-2250.

The mission of the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities is to inspire and support intellectual curiosity and imagination in all Rhode Islanders through lifelong learning in the humanities.

WSBE Rhode Island PBS is owned and operated by the Rhode Island Public Telecommunications Authority, a quasi-public agency of the State of Rhode Island. Rhode Island PBS is a viewer-supported member of the Public Broadcasting Service. As Rhode Island’s most accessible learning resource, Rhode Island PBS is dedicated to the principle of lifelong learning and uses the power of media to educate, inform, enrich, inspire, and entertain viewers of all ages in Rhode Island, southeastern Massachusetts, and eastern Connecticut. For more information about the programs and services at Rhode Island PBS, visit www.RIpbs.org

 

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